Entries Tagged as 'Cool shit'

BuzzFeed: 19 Completely Terrifying Vintage Sex Toys

October 23, 2014

Good luck getting through this list without crossing your legs and clenching!

(Photo courtesy of the Antique Vibrator Museum)

#TURNOUTFORWHAT

October 7, 2014

This video is basically my favorite thing ever.

Skeet, skeet, skeet!

Lover.ly: 13 Never-Before-Seen Photos of JFK and Jackie’s Wedding Are Now for Sale

October 2, 2014

I kiiiiinda lost my shit when I got this press release. See more here!

(Photos courtesy of RR Auction)

Lover.ly: This Disney Projection Wedding Cake Is SO Rad!

September 30, 2014

I’m not really a Disney person, but this is legit.

See the video and learn more about it on Lover.ly!

Let’s all watch Sha’Condria Sibley deliver an inspiring and badass poem

September 13, 2014

My pal Chanelle shared this Upworthy post last night, and while I generally find Upworthy smarmy as hell, I’m actually glad I clicked through on this one. Here’s the video.

It’s so interesting to me that in recent years, more and more white kids are getting saddled with “big names.” While these names are the subject of plenty of mocking, I doubt the Kaybryns and Teiguns (it’s pronounced TAY-gun) will have the same results as the Sha’Condrias of the world when they send their resumes to potential employers. 

Throwback Thursday: Vintage Beauty Products

September 4, 2014

When I was in Michigan in July, I came across a bag of vintage beauty products for $15; I was so excited about my find, I decided to pick up a few more beauty items from elsewhere in the store while I was at it. Here’s the best of my haul…

Vintage beauty products

Avon perfumed talc (1977), Avon lotion jar, bobby pins, Cashmere Bouquet face powder, and Winx mascara.

Vintage beauty products

I love things like this: a little bit of history, and a nice addition to my home decor. (These products are currently living on a pretty tray in my bathroom.) I haven’t been able to find much info on that amazing Winx mascara (which was clearly the best find). Initial research said 1913, but I didn’t have a solid source for it. I did find ads for Winx (and the Cashmere Bouquet) from the 1920s, so perhaps that’s a more accurate time frame.

Vintage beauty products

Regardless of the exact year, I think we can agree that the branding of this possibly-100-year-old mascara is completely on point.

Barbie’s new Instagram account is amazing

August 28, 2014

When my friend Dallas informed me of this last night, my first reaction was, “Great, another rich white girl with tons of clothes to follow on Instagram.” But I gotta say: Barbie’s Insta game is on point

Well-played, Mattel. Well-played.

Lover.ly: 10 Totally Legit Tips from the Vintage Book “Don’ts for Husbands”

August 21, 2014

“We recently shared our favorite tips from the vintage book Don’ts for Wives; despite the fact that the book was published in 1913, the advice is surprisingly relevant to modern life. And the tips in the companion book for husbands are just as useful! Author Blanche Ebbutt writes in the intro, ‘No doubt you know a good deal about women, but (if you are in the early years of your married life) not nearly as much as you will in another decade.’ Ain’t that the truth.”

Head to Lover.ly to read all 10 tips!

20 photos of black women at work during World War II

August 18, 2014

When I was in Chicago last month, everyone asked me what Eric was doing to keep himself busy while I was out of town. Every time, I replied, “Watching shows about World War II on the History Channel, probably.” And every time, there was a look of recognition among both the married women (and men) in the room. Apparently, I’m not the only one whose husband spends every Sunday watching what I refer to as “the White Men’s History Channel” or, simply, “the Hitler Channel.” 

I specialized in history in college, so I want to like the History Channel…but just I’m not here for all the programming that’s devoted to white men doing it by themselves. But yesterday, I got my own history fix when I went way down the rabbit hole that is the Library of Congress website (something I really need to do more often). Eventually, I started looking for pictures of black women during World War II…and three hours later, I emerged with these lovely photos. 

20 photos of black women at work during World War II

Four WACs during World War II.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Lt. Harriet Ida Pickens and Ens. Frances Wills, 1944.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

A black woman working on a dive bomber, 1943. (Photo by Alfred T. Palmer.)

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Miss Amanda Smith working at the Long Beach Plant of the Douglas Aircraft Company.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

A group of nurses receiving mail in 1943.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

20-year-old Annie Tabor at work at a plant in the Midwest.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Five women working for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company, 1943.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

A riveter at work in Burbank, California.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Three nurses at work, June 1944.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Army nurses arriving in Greenock, Scotland.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Miss Juanita E. Gray at work in the Washington Navy Yard.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Miss Lucille Little at work at the El Segundo Plant of the Douglas Aircraft Company.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Pfc. Johnnie Mae Welton working in a lab at Fort Jackson Station Hospital in 1944.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

According to the original caption, “Hospital Apprentices second class Ruth C. Isaacs, Katherine Horton and Inez Patterson (left to right) are the first Negro WAVES to enter the Hospital Corps School at National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, 03/02/1945.”

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Willa Beatrice Brown was the first black woman to earn a pilot’s license in the US, and she is widely credited with creating the squadron that became known as the Tuskegee Airmen. (Maybe you’ve heard of them?)

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Pvt. Ruth L. James, 1945.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

WAAC cooks making dinner, 1942.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Two WAACs at work in Washington, DC in 1942.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

Mrs. Mary K. Adair takes an exam at Officers’ Candidate School, 1942.

20 photos of African-American women at work during World War II

US Navy WAVE Apprentice Seaman Frances Bates, 1945.

Remember these women the next time historians are pretending that African-Americans weren’t invented until 1960.

#MightyKacy

July 16, 2014

At some point last year, Eric discovered “American Ninja Warrior” and I ended up watching a bit of it with him. I wasn’t that into it—it’s a little too “fuck yeah masculinity!” for my taste, and I got annoyed when people would get out so quickly after tons of of hype—but I watched enough of it to know how badass this video of Kacy Catanzaro (a five-foot-tall, 100-pound gymnast) going through the course is. 

I just…What?! She just owns it! She barely breaks a sweat!! I NEED TO GO WORK OUT. 

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